07.07.2021 | History

3 edition of Conquest and Pestilence in the Early Spanish Philippines found in the catalog.

Conquest and Pestilence in the Early Spanish Philippines

the art of the Christian Egyptians from the late antique to the Middle Ages

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      • nodata

        StatementUniversity of Hawaii Press
        PublishersUniversity of Hawaii Press
        Classifications
        LC Classifications2009
        The Physical Object
        Paginationxvi, 98 p. :
        Number of Pages49
        ID Numbers
        ISBN 10nodata
        Series
        1nodata
        2
        3

        nodata File Size: 6MB.


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Conquest and Pestilence in the Early Spanish Philippines by University of Hawaii Press Download PDF EPUB FB2


However, in the longer term the impact of colonial rule was moderated by the limited Spanish presence that resulted from the remoteness of the islands from Spain and the limited opportunities there for wealth creation, notably in the form of precious minerals. Scholars have long assumed that Spanish colonial rule had only a limited demographic impact on the Philippines.

NEWSON, Conquest and Pestilence in the Early Spanish Philippines. Of all the countries of Southeast Asia, the Philippines is probably the most well-endowed in terms of data for the historical demographer of the early modern period. In Southeast Asia the decline does not appear to have been as great, but it extended through the seventeenth century, whereas by then native populations in some parts of the Americas had begun to recover.

Forged from a partnership between a university press and a library, Project MUSE is a trusted part of the academic and scholarly community it serves.

However, the islands were not abandoned totally, for they were of strategic importance in the Hispano-Dutch War and in holding the frontier against Moro incursions. By now we are all familiar with the fact that European-introduced diseases played a dynamic role in the successful European invasion and conquest of the Americas.

Conquest and Pestilence in the Early Spanish Philippines is higher than previous estimates and implies that the decline in the early colonial period was greater than often supposed. Scholars have long assumed that Spanish colonial rule had only a limited demographic impact on the Philippines. In colonial times overland travel was hampered by the rugged terrain, while the frequency of tropical storms and the lack of deep, well-sheltered harbors, especially on the western coast, made communications by sea difficult.

Linda Newson, Conquest and Pestilence in the Early Spanish Philippines, Social History of Medicine

Conquest and Pestilence in the Early Spanish Philippinesilluminates the demographic history of the Spanish Philippines in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and, in the process, challenges these assumptions.

Rather it is has generally been inferred from the relatively low level. "Conquest and Pestilence in the Early Spanish Philippines. She also shows that the initial conquest of the Philippines was far bloodier than has often been supposed and that subsequent Spanish demands for tribute, labor, and land brought socioeconomic transformations and depopulation that were prolonged beyond the early conquest years.

39the tendency of the dying to obtain medical services as opposed to purely palliative care increased over the period. This familiar pattern informs Linda A. In this provocative new work, Linda Newson convincingly demonstrates that the Filipino population suffered a significant decline in the early colonial period.

Of all the countries of Southeast Asia, the Philippines is probably the most well-endowed in terms of data for the historical demographer of the early modern period. No one will ever know exactly how many people there were in the Philippines when the Spanish arrived or the extent to which the Filipino population declined in the subsequent two centuries.

Southeast Asia is generally considered to have been part of the Eurasian disease pool, with Old World diseases spreading to the islands as trading contacts with the mainland developed in the Christian Era.

In areas as distant as New England and Peru, the arrival of Europeans and their invisible allies—infectious diseases—resulted in a ninety-percent reduction in the indigenous population. However, the issue of whether or not Filipinos had acquired such immunity has not been investigated directly.